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Jamilla Naji art at 78th St Studios - Photo Bob Perkoski
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cleveland clinic exports marquee brand to abu dhabi

In a Reuters article titled, "Cleveland Clinic exports marquee Ohio brand to Abu Dhabi," by Robin Respaut writes about the Clinic's plans to open a hospital on Al Maryah Island in Abu Dhabi.
 
"For decades the Cleveland Clinic has provided healthcare to the upper echelons of Middle Eastern society who fly halfway across the world for treatment at the Ohio-based private medical center," she writes. "Soon, they can skip the trip."
 
Early next year, the Cleveland Clinic will open an ultra-modern, 364-bed hospital on Al Maryah Island in Abu Dhabi. The Clinic currently helps manage the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City facility in Abu Dhabi, but this will be the first time it puts its name and personnel in the region.
 
"We look at it as our petrodollars coming home to Cleveland," Cleveland Clinic's chief executive officer Dr Toby Cosgrove said during an interview. "It's money coming back to us."
 
Read more about the state-of-the-art facility here.


crop bistro included in listing of cool restaurants in converted spaces

In a Thrillist feature titled, "Drinking in Banks and Jails: 21 Restaurants/Bars Converted from Very Different Buildings, Crop Bistro in Ohio City earns a spot.
 
"We've all been in a Thai restaurant that was obviously once a Pizza Hut, but even the ghost of a stuffed-crust pizza haunting your pad Thai has nothing on a cool, old building that's been converted to a place where you can stuff your face or give your liver a workout," writes Andy Kryza. "From an old elementary school to a jail and an airplane, these 21 joints keep their historical roots while also keeping you fat and happy."
 
Crop Bar and Bistro
Cleveland, OH
 
What it was: A gigantic 1925 bank, complete with marble columns, huge arches, and 17,000 feet of floor space.
 
What it is now: "One of Ohio's most-lauded restaurants, Crop has kept the integrity of the space intact -- from the remastered columns to the gigantic murals over the bar -- while cooking up high-end cuisine in an open kitchen set up right in the middle of the packed floor. In the basement, meanwhile, you can rent out the vault space, which is great for parties or, in the event of a zombie apocalypse, survival."
 
Read the rest of the listacle here.


cleveland selected as one of nation's most underrated food cities

Thrillist, the digital magazine for men, recently published a feature on the "The 7 most underrated food cities in America." Writer Dan Gentile included Cleveland in the listing.
 
"What makes a great food city isn't necessarily Michelin stars or food trucks per capita," he writes. "While NYC, LA, and Chicago have always shined brightest, and upstarts like Austin and Portland might be the kings of meals on wheels, there are a ton of cities out there where tradition and innovation mix into unique melting pots... full of melting food."
 
To compile the list, the writer reached out to community experts to state why their cities are considered underrated, and what spots you should be sure to try when you visit. For the Cleveland entry, that honor fell to Sam McNulty of Market Garden Brewery.
 
"Cleveland has been punching very far above its weight in the food and craft beer scene in recent years," McNulty states. "Having traveled all over the world and been a food and beer tourist on most continents, I am still thrilled when the plane touches down here in Cleveland, and I'm back in this Mecca of local food and local beer."
 
"Forbes magazine just wrote a piece about Cleveland being the new Brooklyn. And while they meant it as a compliment, we're actually much more a new Cleveland with our own authentic and edgy flavor."
 
Read the rest right here.


thriving playhouse square neighborhood profiled in new york times

In a New York Times feature titled, "Cleveland’s Thriving Theater Hub Lures Residents," writer Erik Piepenburg outlines how Playhouse Square continues to evolve from an entertainment-only district to a 24/7 community.
 
"Residents of Midtown Manhattan are accustomed to walking to the Theater District to see what’s new on Broadway," Piepenburg writes. "But Mr. Hawley’s trip to and from Cleveland’s gilded Palace Theater was something much more significant. It was a sign, decades in the making, that this city’s efforts to create a thriving residential real estate market in its downtown core was starting to look more like a box-office hit than a flop."
 
The article ticks off positive statistics, supplied by Downtown Cleveland Alliance, that state that roughly 12,000 residents now call downtown Cleveland home, double the amount in 2000. Rental occupancy hovers near 95 percent.
 
"Almost 40 years after the closing of Jacque Brel, and after millions of dollars in renovations and area development, people are not just being entertained in Cleveland’s theater district," notes Piepenburg. "They’re calling it home."
 
Read the rest of the good news here.


another record-breaking year for cleveland international film festival

The 38th Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF), which ran for 12 days in March, again boasted record-breaking attendance figures. This year, CIFF showed 186 feature films and 168 short subjects from 68 countries to 97,804 attendees, which represents a 4.9 percent increase from 2013.

The Roxanne T. Mueller Audience Choice Award for Best Film went to Matt Shepard is a Friend of Mine, directed by Michele Josue.

Read the rest here.


the jake, er, progressive field chosen as one of best ballparks for craft beer fans

In a Daily Mail feature titled, "Best Baseball Stadiums for Craft Beer Around the Country," Cleveland's Progressive Field makes the grade.
 
"As the weather warms up, there’s not much we’d rather do than spend a Saturday at the ballpark," writes Clare Goggin Sivits. "Going to a game is always thrilling, from the rush you feel the first moment you walk through the tunnel and that emerald green field opens up before you to the memories brought back from games you experienced years ago. Even for the casual sports fan, baseball is the perfect excuse to chow down on a hot dog, nibble some nachos, and wash it all down with a beer… or three."
 
Sadly, most parks charge way too much for beer that is way below our standards. Some parks, though, buck trend by offering up great craft beer choices.
 
"Granted, you should probably have to have a reason aside from beer to actually go to these places -- say, you want to see a baseball game? But if you end up at one of these ballparks, you can count on finding a good pint of beer instead of the lame beer options you’d have to settle for elsewhere."
 
 #13: Progressive Field, Cleveland
 
Home Team: Cleveland Indians
 
"The Indians can boast a new partnership with the likes of the New Belgium Brewing Company (makers of the amazing Fat Tire), and Great Lakes Brewing Co (who can boast the killer Great Lakes Eliot Ness). This season is looking up -- the stadium lowered its (previously pretty exorbitant) concession stand prices last year, and also offers ultra-cheap PBRs, just in case."
 
Read the rest right here.


melt bar & grilled among '21 best sando shops in usa'

Thrillist, the digital magazine for men, recently published a feature on the "The 21 Best Sandwich Shops in America." Writer Adam Lapetina included Melt Bar & Grilled in the listing.

"The perfect sandwich is hard to find," Lapetina writes. "But when you do find it, you have to pay homage. From superior ingredients to the freshest-baked bread and sauces that make you say, "Dammit, I kind of want to drink that!", the ideal sammie has to strike a delicate balance, and the people who make them have hit upon something way more important than just a portable meal."

In his entry for Melt, Lapetina writes:

"Cleveland’s got its fair share of interesting people, but not all of them open tattoo-friendly, punk-rock-playing alternative grilled cheese joints, like Matt Fish did when he first founded Melt Bar & Grilled in 2006. Offering patrons who get a Melt tattoo 25% off for life is only the second of his selling points -- the first is grilling up insane grilled cheese sandwiches that keep Ohioans coming back time and time again. The Parmageddon, for example, rocks potato & onion pierogi, sauerkraut, sharp cheddar, and sauteed onions and is every bit as face-melting as its name would suggest."
 
Read the rest here.


humble wine bar on eater's list of '21 hottest pizza places'

Eater, an online repository for the nation's restaurant news, published its latest listing of "The 21 Hottest Pizza Places Across the US Right Now." Humble Wine Bar in Lakewood made the cut.
 
"Here are the 21 hottest pizza restaurants in the country. Please note these are not necessarily pizzerias, but rather restaurants that serve pizza and have opened in the past year or so. By and large, these restaurants were recommended by local Eater editors, in addition to Eater National's Heatmap correspondents."
 
Humble Wine Bar
 
Cleveland Scene dining editor Douglas Trattner wrote in his November Eater Heatmap: "On the heels of his successful gastropub Deagan's, Dan Deagan added this urban wine bar to his portfolio. Gleaming white subway tile, warm woods, concrete floors, and a 500-bottle mahogany wine cellar offer an update to the classic mold. The fare is limited to meat and cheese boards, finger-friendly starters, and thin-crust pizzas, which exit the blistering stone oven hot and crisp."
 
Check out America's best pies here.


toledo blade previews cleveland international film festival

In an article in the Toledo Blade titled, "Cleveland to heat up for film lovers," Kirk Baird previews the Cleveland International Film Festival, which he labels as Ohio’s biggest such event.
 
"The Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) line-up of more than 350 independent films isn’t for everyone, particularly those who prefer movies with celebrity names in the credits," Baird writes. "But for those open to the concept of film as true art rather than commercial enterprise, the long-running festival has much to satisfy the soul and mind."
 
Baird goes on to offer a rundown of the offerings, noting the staggering growth of the decades-old event.
 
 "Now in its 38th year, CIFF is a prominent regional -- and certainly Ohio’s biggest -- film festival, with a combined audience of 95,000 film lovers and filmmakers from around the world expected to attend -- a staggering growth in audience from its first year in 1977 when only eight friends watched a few weekend films at the festival’s first home, Cedar Lee Theatre in Cleveland Heights."
 
Read the entire article here.


#thisiscle promo video goes viral in 3- 2- 1...

On Wednesday, Positively Cleveland, the convention and visitors bureau for Cleveland, announced a new destination brand, presented new plans for its destination development initiatives, unveiled a local social media movement and highlighted a series of organizational accomplishments.
 
But without question, the most buzzed about element of the package was the following video, "A Cleveland Anthem," which promotes the theme: "Cleveland doesn’t follow anyone’s rules – it makes its own."




ceo of breakthrough schools testified to u.s. house on education reform

On March 12, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, chaired by Rep. John Kline (R-MN), held a hearing entitled, “Raising the Bar: The Role of Charter Schools in K-12 Education.” During the hearing, members discussed ways charter schools are empowering parents, pioneering fresh teaching methods, encouraging state and local innovation, and helping students escape underperforming schools.
 
Alan Rosskamm, CEO of Breakthrough Schools in Cleveland, described Breakthrough’s success in raising the bar on student achievement.
 
“In 2012-2013, Breakthrough students, on average, outperformed their peers across the city, county, and state in every subject,” Rosskamm said. “Nationally, Breakthrough Schools were recognized as 1st in reading growth and 4th in math growth among urban charter school networks in the United States in a study by the CREDO Institute at Stanford University.”
 
Mr. Rosskamm’s remarks underscore the unique relationship that Breakthrough Schools has with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The district sponsors eight of Breakthrough’s 10 schools, including Lakeshore Intergenerational School, which will open in Collinwood this August. Four of Breakthrough’s schools are housed in former district buildings and a fifth, Near West Intergenerational School, is in space leased from the district for $1 a year. 

“Half of Cleveland’s top performing schools are public charter schools,” John Zitzner, President of Friends of Breakthrough School, added in a release. “Replicating high performing charters like Breakthrough Schools is critical to turning Cleveland into a championship city for education.”

Read more about the hearing here.


museum's receipt of $10m anonymous gift in the news

Antiques & Fine Art magazine writes that "The Cleveland Museum of Art announced that it has received a $10 million gift from an anonymous donor to further strengthen the institution's mission and core principles, which focus on scholarships, artistic excellence and community engagement. Thanks to the donation, the museum has established two endowments -- one to support community engagement activities and another for interpretation of its permanent collection."
 
Fred Bidwell, interim director, was quoted as saying, "This incredibly generous gift really touches upon the fundamental initiatives of the Cleveland Museum of Art."
 
Check out the entire article here.


the logistics of moving 100 cleveland orchestra musicians, instruments

In advance of the Cleveland Orchestra's upcoming performance in Austin, Texas, the Austin Chronicle published a sort of behind-the-scenes peek at the logistic of travel.

"The Cleveland Orchestra is known around the world for its rich sound, but some of the most important members of the organization don't play an instrument and are never seen or heard by the audience: They're with Operations, the team responsible for all of the behind-the-scenes planning for the orchestra," writes Natalie Zeldin.
 
That work falls on the lap of Julie Kim, director of operations of the Cleveland Orchestra, whose job it is to oversee transportation, hotel bookings, meals…
 
"But that's only the easy half. There's a second whole itinerary for the cargo: the assortment of precious cellos, basses, harps, gongs, and even all of the tuxedos that need to be transported for the performances."
 
"The goal," Kim is quoted as saying, "is always to make sure the cargo and people get there before the concert!"
 
"So when you hear the Cleveland Orchestra play -- and you should -- don't forget to clap for the people you don't see, too."
 
Read the rest of the article here.

pittsburgh post-gazette writer 'gets market buzz in cleveland'

In a feature titled, "Getting a Market Buzz in Cleveland," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writer Diana Nelson Jones compares the West Side Market to her city's eclectic Strip District, as that city plots a course for a grand future marketplace of its own.
 
"Except for the selection of dried beans at Urban Herbs, the West Side Market in Cleveland doesn’t sell anything you can’t find in Pittsburgh’s Strip District. What they have that we don’t have is a grand work of marketplace architecture," she writes.
 
She adds that "the trip prompted many thoughts about what we have and don’t have and led to a rumination on the potential of the Pittsburgh Public Market and the Terminal Building on Smallman Street to be long-term additions to the scene."
 
"As I toured the West Side Market, I caught myself oohing and aahing, wondering why at first and then realizing why -- the intensity of consolidation. It is Wholey’s, Penn Mac, Stamolis, Parma Sausage, Sam Bok, Stan’s, Labad’s, La Prima and every farmers’ market all together in one big teeming, gleaming -- and at times overwhelming -- place."
 
"But the certainty I came away with from Cleveland was that a great city needs a great indoor market scene and any city that still has its old-world market house is blessed, lucky, farsighted or all three."
 
Read the rest of the story here.
 

publication takes a winter road trip to cleveland

Writing for Trib Total Media, Mark Kanny takes his Western PA readers on a winter-themed road trip to Cleveland.

"Perhaps the only way Pittsburgh doesn't mind being beaten by Cleveland is in annual snowfall," he writes. "Located on Lake Erie, Cleveland always wins that contest because of lake-effect precipitation."

"Taking challenge as opportunity, Cleveland Metroparks offers many winter activities, including tobogganing. In addition, there's a free skating rink in University Circle and the local Boston Mills/Brandywine ski resort just south of the city."

Also highlighted are the Rock Hall, Cleveland Museum of Art and Severance Hall.
 
Check out all his great wintertime suggestions here.

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