Love shouldn’t hurt: Organizations to host webinar to stop domestic violence

Amanda WilliamsBob PerkoskiAmanda Williams

About 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States.  On Oct. 10., 46-year-old Amanda Williams was shot multiple times in her Warrensville Heights home. Her fiancé has been charged with murder.

The news of another domestic violence murder in Cleveland prompted Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity to take action. Williams was a member of Delta Sigma Theta.

Today, Thursday, Dec. 7, at 6:30 p.m., the two organizations will host a webinar in is “Love Shouldn’t Hurt” series to bring awareness to and promote the prevention of domestic violence. 

“Stop the Violence, End the Silence: Creating a Safe Exit Plan” will go live at 6:30 p.m. and is open to the public. Registration is requested.  

Tony Charles, conflict resolution committee chair for both the fourth district and Zeta Omega chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, reports that one in four women (41%) and one in nine men (26%) experience severe intimate partner physical violence, sexual violence, or intimate partner stalking during their lifetime. Zeta Omega chapter has a 100-year history of promoting philanthropic programs in the Greater Cleveland community, 

He says those numbers show there must be more attention brought to cases like Williams.

“We seek to bring more awareness to this issue, educate our community as it relates to strategies that can be utilized in order to not become a victim, and hopefully, reduce and/or eliminate the incidence of domestic violence,” he says.

Tonight’s webinar is intended to provide resources to community members who are themselves or know someone who is a victim of domestic violence. Organizers hope to educate participants in creating a safe exit plan out of an abusive relationship, either for themselves or someone close to them. 

Two experts will speak tonight:  

Dr. Lawrence Henry has a Ph.D. in conflict analysis and resolution and has presented at worldwide forums on conflict resolution, intimate partner violence, and sexual assault.  His 2020 doctoral dissertation is titled “A Silent Dilemma: The Challenges Black Collegiate Women Face Disclosing Sexual Victimization.”  Henry retired from the U.S. Army Special Forces Green Beret as a full Colonel after 26 years of service. 

Sheryl Thomas-Washburn s Chief Program Officer at Cleveland’s Journey Center for Safety & Healing and is a graduate of Cleveland State University’s School of Psychology. A native Clevelander, Ms. Thomas-Washburn has more than 25 years of non-profit, social, and human services experience. She is an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

About 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States.  On Oct. 10., 46-year-old Amanda Williams was shot multiple times in her Warrensville Heights home. Her fiancé has been charged with murder.

The news of another domestic violence murder in Cleveland prompted Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity to take action. Williams was a member of Delta Sigma Theta.

Today, Thursday, Dec. 7, at 6:30 p.m., the two organizations will host a webinar in is “Love Shouldn’t Hurt” series to bring awareness to, and promote the prevention of, domestic violence. 

“Stop the Violence, End the Silence: Creating a Safe Exit Plan” will go live at 6:30 p.m. and is open to the public. Registration is requested.  

Tony Charles, fourth district chair of Psi Phi Fraternity, Zeta Omega chapter’s conflict resolution committee, which has a 10-year history in Cleveland in promoting philanthropic programs in the community, reports that one in four women (41%) and one in nine men (26%) experience severe intimate partner physical violence, sexual violence, or intimate partner stalking during their lifetime.

He says those numbers show there must be more attention brought to cases like Willams.

“We seek to bring more awareness to this issue, educate our community as it relates to strategies that can be utilized in order to not become a victim, and hopefully, reduce and/or eliminate the incidence of domestic violence,” he says.

Tonight’s webinar is intended to provide resources to community members who are themselves or know someone who is a victim of domestic violence. Organizers hope to educate participants in creating a safe exit plan out of an abusive relationship, either for themselves or someone close to them. 

Two experts will speak tonight:  

Dr. Lawrence Henry has a Ph.D. in conflict analysis and resolution and has presented at worldwide forums on conflict resolution, intimate partner violence, and sexual assault.  His 2020 doctoral dissertation is titled “A Silent Dilemma: The Challenges Black Collegiate Women Face Disclosing Sexual Victimization.”  Henry retired from the U.S. Army Special Forces Green Beret as a full Colonel after 26 years of service. 

Sheryl Thomas-Washburn s Chief Program Officer at Cleveland’s Journey Center for Safety & Healing and is a graduate of Cleveland State University’s School of Psychology. A native Clevelander, Ms. Thomas-Washburn has more than 25 years of non-profit, social, and human services experience. She is an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

The “Stop the Violence, End the Silence: Creating a Safe Exit Plan” webinar will be held tonight,  Thursday, Dec. 7, at 6:30 p.m. Register here.